Comets Ov Cupid

* Kosmische Musik /Faustian Kultur * * Archaic Futurist *Ur-Metal*

I dissent absolutely from the position of those who welcome the new machine-culture involving a complete break with the past. To me there is nothing really civilized in large-scale organization & spectacular material development—while the modern worship of mere speed & quantity strikes me as being downright decadent.

H.P. Lovecraft: Letters to Robert Bloch (Necronomicon Press, 1993) Letter 11, dated 22 July, 1933. (via abraxasbooks)

(via radical-traditionalism)

cometsovcupid:

Comets Ov Cupid “Viking Spacecraft” 

"Viking Spacecraft" is a track from Comets Ov Cupid’s new CD "Vril Kosmische Urkraft"
available here for purchase
http://cometsovcupid.wordpress.com/20…

Comets Ov Cupid is a gothic space rock project by Jason Kesselring : cosmic music evoking a sense of eternal twilight with a sonic landscape of distorted voices, cosmic pulse and hazy drones. Guitar based in composition that goes from full blow metalgazer bliss out to melancholy astral folk. “Vril Kosmische Urkraft is the third release featuring 9 faustian tone poems. A descent to the middle of the earth to the outer reaches of infinity. 

"Vril Kosmische Urkraft," the third full-length effort by Comets Ov Cupid, finds rural futurist Jason Kesselring paradoxically producing his most varied and yet cohesively-focused release to date. All the sounds he has been working with for years are there, but amalgamated and paced in such a way as to make a complete Work, rather than a collection of pieces that each showcase different aspects of Jason’s considerable command of his instruments. The album begins with a heady Branca-esque spaceward-looking introductory piece before diving headfirst into the most metallic pieces of the bunch, which show a somewhat more blackened and blasted side of Kesselring’s metal leanings than previous efforts have done. These two pieces are still very atmospheric and expansive in nature however, and show a virtuosity seldom apparent in straightforward black metal while using its atmospheric nature to achieve a more cosmic end (all the while the lack of vocals on this all-instrumental album keep things from veering into caricature or pastiche of any kind). From there things follow an arc into a true Kosmische sound art form, using sonic extremes both painful and meditative to explore outer and inner spaces alike (or indeed simultaneously). Previous releases have employed the acoustic guitar as a break or interlude, but here we find the instrument used in fuller effect in a couple of longer pieces, and Jason’s Jansch-influenced playing really adds a layer of depth and scope to a part of the record’s arc that could have delved lazily into "drone" territory for too long. The album once again veers into heavier territory toward the end before going out in a haze of "Eternal Ice" at its closing.
It bears mentioning that Jason’s virtuosic command of the guitar is a means to an end and not an end in itself; throughout the record his technique is undeniable, but it is only brought to the fore with speed and volume when necessary to the whole and his playing does not ever veer into mere pyrotechnic display. Very few releases manage to combine such disparate elements as Cosmic Music, black metal, noise and acid-folk while still retaining a cohesive and total vision and purpose. A rare thing indeed. The tundra of North Dakota is indeed a fruitful place.”
- Erik Wivinus (Thunderbolt Pagoda)