Comets Ov Cupid

* Kosmische Musik /Faustian Kultur * * Archaic Futurist *Ur-Metal*

distant-traveller:

First image of the Moon taken by a U.S. spacecraft






Ranger 7 took this image, the first picture of the moon by a U.S. spacecraft, on July 31, 1964 at 13:09 UT (9:09 AM EDT), about 17 minutes before impacting the lunar surface. The area photographed is centered at 13 S, 10 W and covers about 360 km from top to bottom. The large crater at center right is the 108 km diameter Alphonsus. Above it is Ptolemaeus and below it Arzachel. The terminator is at the bottom right corner. Mare Nubium is at center and left. North is at about 11:00 at the center of the frame. The Ranger 7 impact site is off the frame, to the left of the upper left corner. 
The Ranger series of spacecraft were designed solely to take high-quality pictures of the moon and transmit them back to Earth in real time. The images were to be used for scientific study, as well as selecting landing sites for the Apollo moon missions. Ranger 7 was the first of the Ranger series to be entirely successful. It transmitted 4,308 high-quality images over the last 17 minutes of flight, the final image having a resolution of 0.5 meter/pixel.

Image credit: NASA

distant-traveller:

First image of the Moon taken by a U.S. spacecraft

Ranger 7 took this image, the first picture of the moon by a U.S. spacecraft, on July 31, 1964 at 13:09 UT (9:09 AM EDT), about 17 minutes before impacting the lunar surface. The area photographed is centered at 13 S, 10 W and covers about 360 km from top to bottom. The large crater at center right is the 108 km diameter Alphonsus. Above it is Ptolemaeus and below it Arzachel. The terminator is at the bottom right corner. Mare Nubium is at center and left. North is at about 11:00 at the center of the frame. The Ranger 7 impact site is off the frame, to the left of the upper left corner. 

The Ranger series of spacecraft were designed solely to take high-quality pictures of the moon and transmit them back to Earth in real time. The images were to be used for scientific study, as well as selecting landing sites for the Apollo moon missions. Ranger 7 was the first of the Ranger series to be entirely successful. It transmitted 4,308 high-quality images over the last 17 minutes of flight, the final image having a resolution of 0.5 meter/pixel.

Image credit: NASA

(Source: nasa.gov)

chapelkill:

Aubrey Burl’s Prehistoric Henges from the ever-inspiring Shire Archaeology imprint.
Cover photograph shows (clockwise from top left) Arbor Low, Derbyshire, a circle henge (photograph Aubrey Burl); Gorsey Bigbury, Somerset (photograph: Jim Hancock); The Giant’s Ring, County Down (photograph Barrie Hartwell).

chapelkill:

Aubrey Burl’s Prehistoric Henges from the ever-inspiring Shire Archaeology imprint.

Cover photograph shows (clockwise from top left) Arbor Low, Derbyshire, a circle henge (photograph Aubrey Burl); Gorsey Bigbury, Somerset (photograph: Jim Hancock); The Giant’s Ring, County Down (photograph Barrie Hartwell).

(via hierarchical-aestheticism)

cometsovcupid:

Comets Ov Cupid “Viking Spacecraft” 

"Viking Spacecraft" is a track from Comets Ov Cupid’s new CD "Vril Kosmische Urkraft"
available here for purchase
http://cometsovcupid.wordpress.com/20…

Comets Ov Cupid is a gothic space rock project by Jason Kesselring : cosmic music evoking a sense of eternal twilight with a sonic landscape of distorted voices, cosmic pulse and hazy drones. Guitar based in composition that goes from full blow metalgazer bliss out to melancholy astral folk. “Vril Kosmische Urkraft is the third release featuring 9 faustian tone poems. A descent to the middle of the earth to the outer reaches of infinity. 

"Vril Kosmische Urkraft," the third full-length effort by Comets Ov Cupid, finds rural futurist Jason Kesselring paradoxically producing his most varied and yet cohesively-focused release to date. All the sounds he has been working with for years are there, but amalgamated and paced in such a way as to make a complete Work, rather than a collection of pieces that each showcase different aspects of Jason’s considerable command of his instruments. The album begins with a heady Branca-esque spaceward-looking introductory piece before diving headfirst into the most metallic pieces of the bunch, which show a somewhat more blackened and blasted side of Kesselring’s metal leanings than previous efforts have done. These two pieces are still very atmospheric and expansive in nature however, and show a virtuosity seldom apparent in straightforward black metal while using its atmospheric nature to achieve a more cosmic end (all the while the lack of vocals on this all-instrumental album keep things from veering into caricature or pastiche of any kind). From there things follow an arc into a true Kosmische sound art form, using sonic extremes both painful and meditative to explore outer and inner spaces alike (or indeed simultaneously). Previous releases have employed the acoustic guitar as a break or interlude, but here we find the instrument used in fuller effect in a couple of longer pieces, and Jason’s Jansch-influenced playing really adds a layer of depth and scope to a part of the record’s arc that could have delved lazily into "drone" territory for too long. The album once again veers into heavier territory toward the end before going out in a haze of "Eternal Ice" at its closing.
It bears mentioning that Jason’s virtuosic command of the guitar is a means to an end and not an end in itself; throughout the record his technique is undeniable, but it is only brought to the fore with speed and volume when necessary to the whole and his playing does not ever veer into mere pyrotechnic display. Very few releases manage to combine such disparate elements as Cosmic Music, black metal, noise and acid-folk while still retaining a cohesive and total vision and purpose. A rare thing indeed. The tundra of North Dakota is indeed a fruitful place.”
- Erik Wivinus (Thunderbolt Pagoda)



NASA Releases Report On Ancient Roman UFO Accounts

NASA has published a report concerning ancient Roman UFO accounts, the report entitled “Unidentified Flying Objects In Classical Antiquity” was compiled by Richard B. Stothers.
Stothers, who was a graduate of Harvard, had four papers published in the Astrophysical Journal, and was also a member of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies until his death in 2011.
The following is an extract from the report:
A combined historical and scientific approach is applied to ancient reports of what might today be called unidentified flying objects (UFOs).
Many conventionally explicable phenomena can be weeded out, leaving a small residue of puzzling reports.
These fall neatly into the same categories as modern UFO reports, suggesting that the UFO phenomenon, whatever it may be due to, has not changed much over two millennia.
Throughout recorded history, reports of what we today might call unidentified flying objects have been made and preserved.
If more information were available to us, we would perhaps find that conventional scientific hypotheses could explain most, if not all of these.
Certainly this has turned out to be true of most reports from better-documented periods.

There nonetheless remains a small residue of puzzling accounts, and regardless of what interpretation one places on them, these constitute a phenomenon that spans centuries of time and widely different cultures.
What may surprise the serious student of the subject is that, despite the numerous articles and books published by scientists on UFOs over the past six decades, almost no scholarly studies of the very early history of the phenomenon have appeared.

What little has been accomplished was initiated in 1953 by the astronomer Donald Menzel’s naturalistic interpretation of reports in Pliny the Elder’s Natural History.
Menzel’s study, however, proved superficial, and had the unfortunate consequence of inducing UFO enthusiasts to compile long, uncritical lists of all kinds of phenomena seen in the ancient skies and call them UFOs.
Their methodology was roundly criticized in the 1968 Condon Report by Samuel Rosenberg, who did not, however, attempt a fresh start by tracking down and analyzing the primary sources themselves.
Richard Wittmann, ignoring these authors, produced in 1968 a more scholarly, but also more restricted study of ancient “flying shields.”
The subject has languished since 1971 and 1975, when Peter Bicknell published two cautious articles in which UFOs were treated only incidentally.

The most liberal attitude would allow that, to an ancient observer, many aerial phenomena were mysterious and hence to some extent unidentified, despite the observer’s ability to describe them in familiar subjective terms and despite ancient attempts at theorizing about their nature.

Today we can filter out the most obvious cases of conventional phenomena, in spite of the archaic terminology used to describe them.
The approach adopted here will be to search for aerial phenomena in the more reliable ancient reports that look like modern UFOs, but without ignoring other manifestations of “strangeness.”
My working hypothesis will be that most such reports can be explained by conventional scientific ideas and that, among all the reports, only those that defy reasonable interpretation after full analysis can be said to resemble the most puzzling reports made today.

NASA Releases Report On Ancient Roman UFO Accounts

NASA has published a report concerning ancient Roman UFO accounts, the report entitled “Unidentified Flying Objects In Classical Antiquity” was compiled by Richard B. Stothers.

Stothers, who was a graduate of Harvard, had four papers published in the Astrophysical Journal, and was also a member of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies until his death in 2011.

The following is an extract from the report:

A combined historical and scientific approach is applied to ancient reports of what might today be called unidentified flying objects (UFOs).

Many conventionally explicable phenomena can be weeded out, leaving a small residue of puzzling reports.

These fall neatly into the same categories as modern UFO reports, suggesting that the UFO phenomenon, whatever it may be due to, has not changed much over
two millennia.

Throughout recorded history, reports of what we today might call unidentified flying objects have been made and preserved.

If more information were available to us, we would perhaps find that conventional scientific hypotheses could explain most, if not all of these.

Certainly this has turned out to be true of most reports from better-documented periods.

There nonetheless remains a small residue of puzzling accounts, and regardless of what interpretation one places on them, these constitute a phenomenon that spans centuries of time and widely different cultures.

What may surprise the serious student of the subject is that, despite the numerous articles and books published by scientists on UFOs over the past six decades, almost no scholarly studies of the very early history of the phenomenon have appeared.

What little has been accomplished was initiated in 1953 by the astronomer Donald Menzel’s naturalistic interpretation of reports in Pliny the Elder’s Natural History.

Menzel’s study, however, proved superficial, and had the unfortunate consequence of inducing UFO enthusiasts to compile long, uncritical lists of all kinds of phenomena seen in the ancient skies and call them UFOs.

Their methodology was roundly criticized in the 1968 Condon Report by Samuel Rosenberg, who did not, however, attempt a fresh start by tracking down and analyzing the primary sources themselves.

Richard Wittmann, ignoring these authors, produced in 1968 a more scholarly, but also more restricted study of ancient “flying shields.”

The subject has languished since 1971 and 1975, when Peter Bicknell published two cautious articles in which UFOs were treated only incidentally.

The most liberal attitude would allow that, to an ancient observer, many aerial phenomena were mysterious and hence to some extent unidentified, despite the observer’s ability to describe them in familiar subjective terms and despite ancient attempts at theorizing about their nature.

Today we can filter out the most obvious cases of conventional phenomena, in spite of the archaic terminology used to describe them.

The approach adopted here will be to search for aerial phenomena in the more reliable ancient reports that look like modern UFOs, but without ignoring other manifestations of “strangeness.”

My working hypothesis will be that most such reports can be explained by conventional scientific ideas and that, among all the reports, only those that defy reasonable interpretation after full analysis can be said to resemble the most puzzling reports made today.

(via mylittlerewolution)